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 Dear Shari and Toby,  

 


THE REST OF THE BIBLE

2nd Timothy 3:16 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works.  ---Paul writing to Timothy

 

 

 

The New Testament Bible as we know it has gone through a lot of changes. It started as many writings and letters circulating among the churches. It ranged from first-hand accounts by the apostles to opinions or stories previously passed down as oral tradition.  The Bible has changed significantly during the REAL HOLY WARS. Not the ones where The Britts and other Europeans went to Jerusalem to fight for the Temple ground, but the war that started around the end of the first century, involved the entire western world and has continued until today. It is a religious war between many groups of Christians and between Christians and ALL other religions. To understand what started the war it is necessary to follow the origin and development of the surviving scriptures available to us today. Taking a tip from Paul, we need to include ALL available scriptures and evaluate their worth by looking at their origin, purpose, content, and consistency with all other scriptures. In order to have a ruler to measure the worth of these I will suggest the one and only scripture written by an author with undisputable credentials for the purpose of providing guidance for all mankind. Its content is consistent with guidance given in all other scriptures. The scripture I’m describing is the Ten Commandments, the ONLY scripture written directly by Yahweh the God of  Abraham (twice).

  

The Sumerian clay tablets (4500BC to 2000BC) found at Nineveh provided a rich description of mankind’s history similar to Genesis. The two are not contradictory but supplementary. These were dictated to the Priests who served the Anunnaki. The Anunnaki were considered deities at that time and there was no need for other religions. According to the Tablets, it was Enlil (one of the Elohim /Anunnaki) who commanded Abraham to go to the western lands where Israel is today. There were approximately 600 Anunnaki in residence throughout the world at that time. Around 800 to 500 BC they left Earth surface and their personal, direct guidance was not physically available except through telepathy and visions which continue today. The vacuum created by the lack of personal guidance of the Anunnaki During this period, was filled on each continent by people who taught science, ethics, politics and government from old records, insight or communication with the “ones who from heaven came”. As a side note, later information indicates the Anunnaki may still be a group of earthlings living underground today.

 

Confucianism, also known as Ruism, is an ethical and philosophical system, on occasion described as a religion, developed from the teachings of the Chinese philosopher Confucius (551–479 BCE). Confucianism originated as an "ethical-sociopolitical teaching" during China’s Spring and Autumn Period, but later developed metaphysical and cosmological elements in the Han Dynasty. Following the official abandonment of Legalism in China after the Qin Dynasty, Confucianism became the official state ideology of the Han. Nonetheless, from the Han period onwards, most Chinese emperors have used a mix of Legalism and Confucianism as their ruling doctrine. The disintegration of the Han in the second century CE opened the way for the soteriological doctrines of Buddhism and Taoism to dominate intellectual life at that time.

 

Hinduism is a categorization of distinct intellectual or philosophical points of view, rather than a rigid, common set of beliefs. These concepts were not considered a religion at that time but were the explanation of how the world had developed as presented by the Anunnaki.  In the 3rd millennium BC, the Hindu concepts practiced today were developed.

 

Buddhism is a nontheistic religion "right way of living", that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and practices largely based on teachings attributed to Gautama Buddha, commonly known as the Buddha ("the awakened one"). According to Buddhist tradition, the Buddha lived and taught in the eastern part of the Indian subcontinent sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BC.

 

Egyptian Scriptures were developed. These were written in hieroglyphics. Much of this has to do with religion/science developed prior to 10,000 BC. These concepts, stories, and historical events were recorded for knowledge to be passed down. The origin of much of this knowledge was from the kings (worshiped as deities). Many of the Sumerian concepts were included. The two oldest versions are the Kolbrin (~1400 BC) and the Book of the Dead (I have not studied  this one). The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as "Book of Coming Forth by Day". Another translation would be "Book of emerging forth into the Light". "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.

The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlier Pyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period (11th to 7th centuries BCE). A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased.

There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. The Book of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrus scroll, and often illustrated with vignettes depicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife.

 

All of the above point back to Immortal Man, God, Yahweh, Brahma—as the one who created man and begotten Son of Man, Christ, Adam of the light, Manu----. All of the above have a Pantheistic view of religion. God, Yahweh, Brahma,was created by another power in another dimension. All of the above have developed into religions in different parts of the world until today they are very clear and concise as to what is needed to improve our selves.

 

The Old Testament or Hebrew Bible starts with a BRIEF creation story provided by Yahweh to Moses and his directions for daily living. This is a similar story to the Sumerian Tablets. Both stories then tell of a priest who was relocated to UR in approximately 2200 BC, and his son Abram. Abram was commanded to move and settle in the western edge of Sumeria and take control of the region. His name was changed to Abraham and was promised the Earth would be blessed by his to-be-begotten children. These children became known as the Israelites and Arabs. Their history is recorded in the rest of the Old Testament. About 700-800 years later (middle of the 5th century BC), when Yahweh did not walk with the Israelites but did talk with them, it was stated that a leader/teacher would be born in a little over 450 years and would shed much light on how man was to progress. This “light” was Jesus, The Son of Man. In three years his teachings would affect everything that happened for the next 2,000 years.

 

For the first 300 years AD the church was groups meeting in houses and then larger buildings. Information and scriptures were shared along with ideas and concepts. The letters and writings forming the New Testament had been gathering into a list since about 140AD. Lists for the Old Testament had been gathering since about 500BC. The first known attempt to create a list, 3rd century BC, is known as the Septuagint. It is from the Latin word septuaginta (meaning seventy), is a translation of the Hebrew Bible and some related texts into Koine Greek. As the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, it is also called the Greek Old Testament. This translation is quoted in the New Testament, particularly in the Pauline epistles, and also by the Apostolic Fathers and later Greek Church Fathers. The title and its Roman numeral acronym LXX refer to legendary seventy Jewish scholars who solely translated the Five Books of Moses as early as the late 2nd century BCE.[3] This translation is not extant, except as rare fragments. By the early 3rd century, Christian theologians like Origen of Alexandria may have been using—or at least were familiar with—the same 27 books found in modern New Testament editions, though there were still disputes over the canonicity of some of the writings (see also Antilegomena). Likewise by 200, the Muratorian fragment shows that there existed a set of Christian writings somewhat similar to what is now the New Testament, which included four gospels and argued against objections to them. Thus, while there was a good measure of debate in the Early Church over the New Testament canon, the major writings were accepted by almost all Christians by the middle of the 3rd century.

 

The Old Testament or Hebrew Bible is specific to the Jewish people and their relationship to Yahweh. It only provides the requirements for remaining loyal to Yahweh. References the soul (434) are clearly to a physical person with only a couple of ambiguous references to “something else”. The phrase “son of man” clearly refers to a physical man’s son. The New Testament is addressing the Jewish people and the Gentiles relationships to each other. It provides guidance for obtaining eternal life and a relationship to God. References to the soul (36) are divided between referencing to a physical person and clearly referencing the other part of man (13). The phrase “son of man”, as used by Jesus referring to himself, clearly refers to the concept of Jesus’ station in the hierarchical divinity. The development of this “soul” was the central theme in Christ’s teachings. During this first 300 years AD, a significant split in the understanding of Christ’s teachings developed. The larger portion of the church was concerned with persecution by the Roman Government at first and later with how to control the masses in order to establish a political base and promote the church as “God’s Kingdom”. A smaller group, who believed in reaching Christ and God from within one’s self, wanted no external legal system or governing body to direct that connection. The larger group also focused in on this three-dimensional planet as the center of God’s attention. The smaller group believed in a more Pantheistic point of view with “God” being the controller of more than just this universe. The smaller group were the Gnostics. In an Edger Cayce reading he was directly asked about them.

5749-14

Q. – 21 A problem that concerns a parallel to Christianity. Is Gnosticism the closest type of Christianity to that which is given through this source?

A – 21 This is a parallel, and was the commonly accepted one until there began to be set rules in which there were attempts to take short cuts. And there are none in Christianity.

 

 A council of Christian bishops was convened in Nicaea in Bithynia by the Roman Emperor Constantine I in AD 325. The results of this Council put an end to the split in the understanding of Christ’s teachings. The larger group became the Catholic Church and they extinguished the Gnostics and their scriptures as heretics. Many of the Gnostic concepts were edited or “translated” out of the scriptures of the “acceptable” list and the Bible as we know it today was formed. The Gnostic scriptures were destroyed except for the buried ones which were rediscovered in the 20TH century near Qumran. The early church fathers regarded anything the Hebrew wrote as "heresies" and called many of the Jews "gnostics"; however, it is quite clear from the writings of Shaul (Paul), from Yahshua himself, and from the apostolic letters (called the "general epistles", the ones written in Hebrew and were disputed by the church fathers) that "gnosticism" was a prevalent religious concept in both Judaism and the Primitive Congregation of Yahshua. These "gnostics" (any first century Jew writing in the Hebrew language about the concept of "good and evil") were considered heretical. The reason for this is that the latter "church" (from 70 C.E. onward) was steeped in Babylonian mysticism due to so many of its members being former pagans who promulgated the "savior god" or the "man-god" of the Babylonian and Egyptian pantheons. The pantheistic view and belief in the power and responsibility of the individual placed the Gnostic concepts at odds with the legalistic Church. This follows an identical pattern as Christ’s teachings of man having internal access to God and the legalistic views of the established Jewish Church. The results were very similar for similar reasons. The Catholic Church extinguished the Gnostics and their writings.

 

 

 

 

The Apocrypha books cannonized in the early catholic bible would be classified as follows:--

   Palestinian Jewish Literature

o Historical

1 Esdras (i.e. Greek Ezra).

1st Enoch  http://reluctant-messenger.com/1enoch01-60.htm

1 Maccabees.

o Legendary

Book of Baruch

Book of Judith

o Apocalyptic

2 Esdras (see also Apocalyptic literature)

o Didactic

Sirach (also known as Ecclesiasticus)

Tobit

   Hellenistic Jewish Literature:--

o Historical and Legendary

Additions to Daniel

Additions to Esther

Epistle of Jeremiah

2 Maccabees

Prayer of Manasseh

o Didactic

Book of Wisdom

Old Testament Apocrypha

1 Esdras | Introduction and Summary |

1 Maccabees | Introduction and Summary |

2 Esdras (a.k.a 4 Ezra) | Introduction and Summary |

2 Maccabees | Introduction and Summary |

3 Maccabees | Introduction and Summary |

4 Ezra (a.ka. 2 Esdras) | Introduction and Summary |

4 Maccabees | Introduction and Summary |

Baruch | Introduction and Summary |

Bel and the Dragon (addition to Daniel) | Introduction and Summary |MENTIONS MARDUK

Daniel and Susanna (addition to Daniel) | Introduction and Summary |

Esther, Additions to | Introduction and Summary |

Judith | Introduction and Summary |

Letter of Jeremiah | Introduction and Summary |

Prayer of Azariah (addition to Daniel) | Introduction and Summary |

Prayer of Manasseh, The | Introduction and Summary |

Psalm 151 | Introduction and Summary |

Sirach | Introduction and Summary |

Tobit | Introduction and Summary |

Wisdom of Solomon, The | Introduction and Summary |

This is a popularized translation of the OT pseudepigrapha, quasi-Biblical writings which never achieved canonical status (or inclusion in any of the official Apocrypha). This isn't to say that these documents are forgeries, just that for one reason or another they were not considered part of the Biblical text by the first millenium (C.E.) compilers.

 

The First Book of Adam and Eve
The Second Book of Adam and Eve
The Book of the Secrets of Enoch
The Psalms of Solomon
The Odes of Solomon
The Letter of Aristeas
Fourth Book of Maccabees
The Story of Ahikar
The Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs
Testament of Reuben
Testament of Simeon
Testament of Levi
The Testament of Judah
The Testament of Issachar
The Testament of Zebulun
The Testament of Dan
The Testament of Naphtali
The Testament Of Gad
The Testament of Asher
The Testament of Joseph
The Testament of Benjamin

 

 

CHRONOLOGICAL LISTING OF EARLY CHRISTIAN SCRIPTURES

WITH RANGE OF APPROXIMATE DATE OF WRITING (AD)

BOOKS OF THE NEW TESTAMENT ARE MARKED “NT”

BOOKS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT ARE MARKED “OT”

BOOKS CONTAINING BASIC GNOSTIC BELIEFS ARE MARKED “GB”

 

 

30-60

Passion Narrative

40-80

Lost Sayings Gospel Q

SIMULAR TO MARK

50-60

1 Thessalonians NT

50-60

Philippians NT

50-60

Galatians NT

50-60

1 Corinthians NT

50-60

2 Corinthians NT

50-60

Romans NT

50-60

Philemon NT

50-80

Colossians NT

50-90

Signs Gospel

SIMULAR TO JOHN

50-95

Book of Hebrews NT

50-120

Didache

GOOD ADVICE

50-140

Gospel of Thomas GB

50-140

Oxyrhynchus 1224 Gospel

MUCH MISSING

50-150

Apocalypse of Adam

Expanded story of Adam and Eve

50-150

Eugnostos the Blessed GB

50-200

Sophia of Jesus ChristGB

65-80

Gospel of MarkNT

70-100

Epistle of James NT

70-120

Egerton Gospel

FRAGMENTS

70-160

Gospel of Peter

FRAGMENTED PARTS OF THE FOUR GOSPELS

70-160

Secret Mark

MINIMAL INFO

70-200

Fayyum Fragment

A FRAGMENT

70-200

Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs

GOOD ADVICE

73-200

Mara Bar Serapion

MINIMUM INFO

80-100

2 Thessalonians NT

80-100

Ephesians NT

80-100

Gospel of Matthew NT

80-110

1 Peter NT

80-120

Epistle of Barnabas

GOOD ADVICE,

SCRIPTURAL INTERPRETATION

80-130

Gospel of Luke NT

80-130

Acts of the Apostles NT

80-140

1 Clement

GOOD ADVICE

80-150

Gospel of the Egyptians

80-150

Gospel of the Hebrews

80-250

Christian Sibyllines

90-95

Revelation NT

90-96

2Esdras or 4Ezra OT

APOCRYPHA

90-120

Gospel of John NT

90-120

1 John NT

90-120

2 John NT

90-120

3 John NT

90-120

Epistle of Jude NT

93

Flavius Josephus

100-150

1 Timothy NT

100-150

2 Timothy NT

100-150

Titus NT

100-150

Apocalypse of Peter

Dictated to Clemente

Beginning to end of times

100-150

Secret Book of James

Conversation with Christ

100-150

Preaching of Peter

100-160

Gospel of the Ebionites

CHRIST’S BABTISM

100-160

Gospel of the Nazoreans

FRAGMENTS

100-160

Shepherd of Hermas
VISIONS BY A BISHOP

100-160

2 Peter NT

100-200

Odes of Solomon

100-200

Gospel of Eve

FRAGMENT

100-230

Thunder, Perfect Mind

POETRY

101-220

Book of Elchasai

FRAGMENT

105-115

Ignatius of Antioch

ADVICE

110-140

Polycarp to the Philippians

ADVICE

110-140

Papias

ADVICE

110-160

Oxyrhynchus 840 Gospel

WORDS OF CHRIST?

110-160

Traditions of Matthias

FRAGMENT

111-112

Pliny the Younger

LETTER TO CHRIST

115

Suetonius

ROMAN HISTORY OF CEASERS

115

Tacitus

120-130

Quadratus of Athens

FRAGMENT

120-130

Apology of Aristides

120-140

Basilides

120-140

Naassene Fragment

120-160

Valentinus

sermon

120-180

Apocryphon of John NT

120-180

Gospel of Mary GB

120-180

Dialogue of the Savior

MUCH MISSING

120-180

Gospel of the Savior

FRAGMENTS

120-180

2nd Apocalypse of James

DISCOURSE OF JAMES THE JUST

120-

 

 

 

 

120-180

ONWARD – WITH NOTABLE EXCEPTIONS

ONLY OPINIONS AND REWORK OF OLDER TEXTS

 

 

Trimorphic Protennoia

120-180

Gospel of Perfection

120-200

Genna Marias

130-140

Marcion

130-150

Aristo of Pella

130-160

Epiphanes On Righteousness

130-160

Ophite Diagrams

130-160

2 Clement

130-170

Gospel of Judas GB

130-200

Epistle of Mathetes to Diognetus

140-150

Epistula Apostolorum

140-160

Ptolemy

140-160

Isidore

140-170

Fronto

140-170

Infancy Gospel of James

140-170

Infancy Gospel of Thomas

140-180

Gospel of Truth

sermon

150-160

Martyrdom of Polycarp

150-160

Justin Martyr

150-180

Excerpts of Theodotus

150-180

Heracleon

150-200

Ascension of Isaiah

A fictional vision

150-200

Interpretation of Knowledge

150-200

Testimony of Truth

150-200

Acts of Peter

150-200

Acts of John

150-200

Acts of Paul

150-200

Acts of Andrew

150-225

Acts of Peter and the Twelve

150-225

Book of Thomas the Contender

150-250

Paraphrase of Shem

150-250

Fifth and Sixth Books of Esra

150-300

Authoritative Teaching

150-300

Coptic Apocalypse of Paul

150-300

Prayer of the Apostle Paul

150-300

Discourse on the Eighth and Ninth

150-300

Melchizedek

150-350

Preaching of Paul

150-350

Epistle to the Laodiceans

150-350

Questions of Mary

150-350

Allogenes, the Stranger

150-350

Hypsiphrone

150-350

Valentinian Exposition

150-350

Act of Peter

150-360

Concept of Our Great Power

150-400

Acts of Pilate

150-400

Anti-Marcionite Prologues

150-400

Dialogue Between John and Jesus

160-170

Tatian's Address to the Greeks

160-180

Claudius Apollinaris

160-180

Apelles

160-180

Julius Cassianus

160-250

Octavius of Minucius Felix

161-180

Acts of Carpus

165-175

Melito of Sardis

165-175

Hegesippus

165-175

Dionysius of Corinth

165-175

Lucian of Samosata

167

Marcus Aurelius

170-175

Diatessaron

170-200

Dura-Europos Gospel Harmony

170-200

Muratorian Canon

170-200

Treatise on the Resurrection

170-220

Letter of Peter to Philip

170-230

Thought of Norea

175-180

Athenagoras of Athens

175-185

Irenaeus of Lyons

175-185

Rhodon

175-185

Theophilus of Caesarea

175-190

Galen

178

Celsus

178

Letter from Vienna and Lyons

180

Passion of the Scillitan Martyrs

180-185

Theophilus of Antioch

180-185

Acts of Apollonius

180-220

Bardesanes

180-220

Kerygmata Petrou

180-230

Hippolytus of Rome

180-230

Sentences of Sextus

180-250

1st Apocalypse of James

180-250

Gospel of Philip

182-202

Clement of Alexandria

185-195

Maximus of Jerusalem

185-195

Polycrates of Ephesus

188-217

Talmud

189-199

Victor I

190-210

Pantaenus

190-230

Second Discourse of Great Seth

193

Anonymous Anti-Montanist

193-216

Inscription of Abercius

197-220

Tertullian

200-210

Serapion of Antioch

200-210

Apollonius

200-220

Caius

200-220

Philostratus

200-225

Acts of Thomas

200-230

Ammonius of Alexandria

200-230

Zostrianos

200-230

Three Steles of Seth

200-230

Exegesis on the Soul

200-250

Didascalia

200-250

Books of Jeu

200-300

Pistis Sophia

200-300

Tripartite Tractate

200-300

Hypostasis of the Archons

200-300

Prayer of Thanksgiving

200-300

Coptic Apocalypse of Peter

200-330

Apostolic Church Order

200-350

Holy Book of the Great Invisible Spirit

200-450

Monarchian Prologues

203

Acts of Perpetua and Felicitas

203-250

Origen

210-245

Lucian of Antioch

217-222

Callistus

230-265

Dionysius of Alexandria

230-268

Firmilian of Caesarea

240-260

Commodian

246-258

Cyprian

250-274

Gospel of Mani

250-300

Teachings of Silvanus

250-300

Excerpt from the Perfect Discourse

250-350

Coptic Apocalypse of Elijah

250-400

Apocalypse of Paul

251-253

Pope Cornelius

251-258

Novatian

254-257

Pope Stephen

259-268

Dionysius of Rome

260-280

Theognostus

265-282

Gregory Thaumaturgus

269-274

Pope Felix

270-310

Victorinus of Pettau

270-312

Methodius

270-330

Marsanes

270-330

On the Origin of the World

270-350

De Recta in Deum Fide

280-300

Hesychius

280-310

Pierius

280-310

Pamphilus of Caesarea

297-310

Arnobius of Sicca

300-311

Peter of Alexandria

300-320

Pseudo-Clementine Homilies

300-340

Eusebius of Caesarea

300-350

Manichean Acts of Leucius Charinus

300-390

Letters of Paul and Seneca

300-400

Apocalypse of Thomas

300-400

Freer Logion

300-600

Gospel of Gamaliel

303-316

Lactantius

310-334

Reticius of Autun

320-380

Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions

 

 


Some scripture of ancient origin are found in the Septuagint but are not present in the Hebrew. These additional books are Tobit, Judith, Wisdom of Solomon, Wisdom of Jesus son of Sirach, Baruch, Letter of Jeremiah (which later became chapter 6 of Baruch in the Vulgate), additions to Daniel (The Prayer of Azarias, the Song of the Three Children, Susanna and Bel and the Dragon), additions to Esther, 1 Maccabees, 2 Maccabees, 3 Maccabees, 4 Maccabees, 1 Esdras, Odes, including the Prayer of Manasseh, the Psalms of Solomon, and Psalm 151.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNCANNONED SCRIPTURES.HTM

6/22/2017