Requirements for the Wilderness Survival merit badge:

  1. Do the following:
    1. Explain to your counselor the hazards you are most likely to encounter while participating in wilderness survival activities, and what you should do to anticipate, help prevent, mitigate, or lessen these hazards.
    2. Show that you know first aid for and how to prevent injuries or illnesses likely to occur in backcountry settings, including hypothermia, heat reactions, frostbite, dehydration, blisters, insect stings, tick bites, and snakebites.
  2. From memory, list the seven priorities for survival in a backcountry or wilderness location. Explain the importance of each one with your counselor.

a.     Qualified Supervision. Whenever planning a trek, make

sure your group includes a mature, conscientious adult at least 21 years old who understands the potential risks involved in the trip and can take responsibility for the groups safety. One additional adult who is at least 18 years old must also accompany the group.

b.     Keep Fit. You can train for a trip in the outdoors just like any other athletic event. Start slowly, gradually increasing the duration and intensity of your workouts, to build your physical fitness and stamina. Staying in good shape helps keep you ready for the physical demands of a trek.

c.     Plan Ahead. Any trip you plan should match the skill level

and fitness of the members of your group. Remember to get

permission from the land owner if you plan to cross or use

private land, and research the terrain, elevation ranges,

trails, wildlife, campsites, typical weather conditions, and

environmental issues for the period of the trek. Know where

you’re going and what to expect.

d.     Gear Up. Before you leave, get topographic maps and current

trail maps for the area. Take equipment—including a

first-aid kit—and clothing that is appropriate for the weather

and is in good condition. Wear proper protection against the

sun and biting insects and animals, and remember to adjust

clothing layers to match the weather conditions. Drink

plenty of water to stay hydrated.

e.     Communicate Clearly and Completely. Communication is

key to a safe outdoor adventure, and staying in touch with

home base is the first step. Complete a trip plan and share

the details of your trek with someone back home.

f.      Monitor Conditions. The leaders are responsible for making

good decisions during the trip, based on their knowledge

of the group’s abilities. Keep an eye on weather conditions

before and during the trip, and continually monitor your

food and water, the group’s morale, and their physical condition.

Don’t enter into a dangerous situation.

g.     Discipline. Make sure everyone in your group understands

the rules and procedures for safe trekking. When participants

know the reasons behind the rules, they are much more likely to follow them.

3.     Describe ways to avoid panic and maintain a high level of morale when lost, and explain why this is important.

  1. Describe the steps you would take to survive in the following exposure conditions:
    1. Cold and snowy
    2. Wet
    3. Hot and dry
    4. Windy
    5. At or on the water
  2. Put together a personal survival kit and be able to explain how each item in it could be useful. (Sample Kit)
  3. Using three different methods (other than matches), build and light three fires.

a.     flint and steel

b.     magnifying lens .<--------------------------------------------------------------do during daylight

c.     fire by friction

  1. Do the following:
    1. Show five different ways to attract attention when lost.
       - noise - SOS
       - Electronic devises
       - mirrors and light
       - colors and motion
       - fire and smoke
    2. Demonstrate how to use a signal mirror.<-----------------------------do during daylight
    3. Describe from memory five ground-to-air signals and tell what they mean.
       

      require                  require                      no                    yes              proceeding
      assistance            medical                                                                 in this
                                   assistance                                                              direction

8.     Improvise a natural shelter. For the purpose of this demonstration, use techniques that have little negative impact on the environment. Spend a night in your shelter.

9.     Explain how to protect yourself from insects, reptiles, bears, and other animals of the local region.

10. Demonstrate three ways to treat water found in the outdoors to prepare it for drinking.

a.          - iodine tablets

b.          - boiling

c.          – filtering - Toby

11. Show that you know the proper clothing to wear while in the outdoors during extremely hot and cold weather and during wet conditions.

12. Explain why it usually is not wise to eat edible wild plants or wildlife in a wilderness survival situation.

Cooking (Degrees in F @ STP)

TYPES OF COOKING – WARMING, BOIL, BAKE/FRY, GRILL/SEAR, Broil/BURN!

WARMING – CHOCOLATE, SUGAR, MILK

BOIL – EGGS (250 - 300), POTATOES, ONIONS (350 TO FINISH)

BAKE/ FRY – POTATOES, MEAT (PREFERABLY SEAR FIRST – EXCEPT BEACON), PIZZA, CAKES, BREADS, (BISCUITS @ 425)

GRILL/SEAR/broil – Start meats, toast, cooks outside and does not cook inside

TEMPERATURES  200, 212, 350, 400, 500

200 – DROPS OF WATER DO NOT BOIL OR SIZZLE

212 - DROPS OF WATER BOIL

350 - DROPS OF WATER SIZZLE AND DISAPPEAR QUICKLY
         GREASE SIMMERS BUT DOES NOT BOIL OR SMOKE

400 – GREASE BOILS AND SMOKES, NOTE: WOOD BURNS AT APPROXIMATELY 450

500 – GREASE SIZZLES AN SMOKES  

 

CONTROLLING TEMPERATURE

BURNER ON STOVE  - PROTECT FROM WIND, ADJUST BURNER

CAMPFIRE – STIR FIRE (WATCH FOR ASHES), ADD FUEL, DISTANCE ABOVE FIRE, PROTECT FROM WIND