11/30/2009 

 

 

 

 

 

 Dear Shari and Toby,  



HOW TO CONTROL PH

 

 

In the previous letter we discussed the similarity of the dietary philosophies of Edgar Cayce, Level1 Philosophy, and Dr. Robert O. Young. All three of these recommend a diet which will provide a proper PH balance in the body. Our blood system is always working to keep itself in the narrow range of pH 7.35 to 7.45. When shopping for the items listed by these three, the nutrition content (freshness, vitamin availability, absence of processing…) should also be kept in mind. When buying food it is necessary to ask the vendor where the food came from, was it processed, vine ripened or how long has it been in the store. Some of these questions and more will provide some indication of the nutritional value of the food. Most processed foods have preservatives added or nutritional ingredients removed during the processing. Many vegetables and fruits have significantly less vitamin content if ripened other than on a vine or tree. “Fresh” fruits and vegetables vary widely in their nutritional content depending on the answers to these and other questions. Part of controlling the PH of the body lies in knowing that the food you buy will provide nutrition as expected when eaten. Note that you need some acidic foods (~20% of your diet) to balance the PH properly. The menus and recipes are an attempt to balance the needed protein, vitamin and fiber content. Generally, there is one month of menus with holiday and occasion meals provided as appropriate. Special meals are used to provide additional variation in diet. Many alkaline food lists are available. The one below will be a guide for foods to choose and where to find these foods in Houston. Serving sizes and quantities are per the menus. Shopping lists are weekly and every fourth one is monthly.

 

 

 STORES AND RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

Alkaline Foods

Acid Foods

Vegetables

Asparagus
Artichokes
Cabbage
Lettuce
Onion
Cauliflower
Radish
Swede
Lambs Lettuce
Peas
Courgette
Red Cabbage
Leeks
Watercress
Spinach
Turnip
Chives
Carrot
Green Beans
Beetroot
Garlic
Celery
Grasses (wheat, straw, barley, dog, kamut etc.)
Cucumber
Broccoli
Kale
Brussels Sprouts

PAK-CHOI

ZUCCHINI

Fruits

Lemon
Lime
Avocado
Tomato
Grapefruit
Watermelon (is neutral)
Rhubarb

Meats

Pork
Lamb
Beef
Chicken
Turkey
Crustaceans
Other Seafood (apart from occasional oily fish such as salmon)

Dairy Products

Milk
Eggs
Cheese
Cream
Yogurt
Ice Cream

Drinks

'Green Drinks'
Fresh vegetable juice
Pure water (use filtered water)
Lemon water (pure water + fresh lemon or lime).
Herbal Tea
Vegetable broth
Non-sweetened Soy Milk
Almond Milk

Others

Vinegar
White Pasta
White Bread
Wholemeal Bread
Biscuits
Soy Sauce
Tamari
Condiments (Tomato Sauce, Mayonnaise etc.)
Artificial Sweeteners
Honey

Drinks

Fizzy Drinks
Coffee
Tea
Beers
Spirits
Fruit Juice
Dairy Smoothies
Milk
Traditional Tea

Seeds, Nuts & Grains

Almonds
Pumpkin
Sunflower
Sesame ,  Tahini Paste
Flax
Buckwheat Groats
Spelt
Lentils
Cumin Seeds
Any sprouted seed

 

Convenience Foods

Sweets
Chocolate
Microwave Meals
Tinned Foods
Powdered Soups
Instant Meals
Fast Food

Fats & Oils

Saturated Fats
Hydrogenated Oils
Margarine (worse than Butter)
Corn Oil
Vegetable Oil
Sunflower Oil

Fats & Oils

Flax
Hemp
Avocado
Olive
Evening Primrose
Borage
Coconut Oil
Oil Blends (such as Udo's Choice)

Others

Sprouts (soy, alfalfa, mung bean, wheat, little radish , chickpea, broccoli etc)
Bragg Liquid Aminos (Soy Sauce Alternative)
Hummus
TURMERIC

Fruits

All fruits aside from those listed in the alkaline column.

Seeds & Nuts

Peanuts
Cashew Nuts
Pistachio Nuts

General Guidance:

Stick to salads, fresh vegetables and healthy nuts and oils.  Try to consume plenty of raw foods and at least 2-3 litres of clean, pure water daily (ideally enhanced with pH drops).use HO.

 

General Guidance:

Steer clear of fatty meats, dairy, cheese, sweets, chocolates, alcohol and tobacco.  Packaged foods are often full of hidden offenders and microwave meals are full of sugars and salts.  Over cooking also removes all of the nutrition from a meal!

 

 

 

 ßPREVIOUS   NEXTà

 

 

 

FOODS

 

COURGETTE/ZUCCHINI

Courgette is the British, and particularly the New Zealand name for zucchinis. People in the UK may refer to courgettes as vegetable marrows. Zucchinis come in many shapes, and a few different colors. People are likely most familiar with courgettes that are long green oblongs, resembling a cucumber. Actually you can find round shapes, and yellow zucchini in many stores. Zucchini is perhaps the best known and most popular of the summer squashes.

 

COUS COUS  - HELPFUL LINK WITH ADVANCED INFO

          Jean Miller - recipe

Couscous or kuskus as it is known in Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, Tunisia, Libya and Egypt (pronounced /ˈkʊskʊs/ or /ˈkuːskuːs/ in the United Kingdom and only the latter in the United States; Arabic: كسكس‎, Berber Seksu, called maftoul in Lebanon and Palestine and Hebrew: קוסקוס‎ in Hebrew) is a dish consisting of spherical granules made by rolling and shaping moistened semolina wheat (sweet corn in Brazil) and then coating them with finely ground wheat flour. The finished granules are about one millimetre in diameter before cooking. The Levantine variant, popular also in Israel, is slightly more than twice the diameter and made of hard wheat instead of semolina.[2] Traditional couscous requires considerable preparation time and is usually steamed. In many places, a more-processed, quick-cook couscous is available and is particularly valued for its short preparation time.

The dish is a primary staple throughout the Maghreb;[3] in much of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya it is also known as a`aam طعام, "food".[citation needed] It is also popular in the West African Sahel, in France, Spain, Madeira, in western Sicily's Province of Trapani, as well as in Greece, Cyprus and parts of the Middle East. It is particularly popular among Jews of North African descent such as the Berber Jews,[4] and is eaten in many other parts of the world as well.

Couscous is traditionally served under a meat or vegetable stew. It can also be eaten alone, flavored, or plain, warm or cold (e.g., mixed with tabouli), or as a side dish. 

FENNEL BULBS

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), is a plant species in the genus Foeniculum (treated as the sole species in the genus by most botanists). It is a member of the family Apiaceae (formerly the Umbelliferae). It is a hardy, perennial, umbelliferous herb, with yellow flowers and feathery leaves. It is generally considered indigenous to the shores of the Mediterranean, but has become widely naturalised elsewhere (particularly, it seems, areas colonized by the Romans[1]) and may now be found growing wild in many parts of the world, especially on dry soils near the sea-coast and on river-banks.

It is a highly aromatic and flavorful herb with culinary and medicinal uses, and is one of the primary ingredients of absinthe. Florence fennel or finocchio is a selection with a swollen, bulb-like stem base that is used as a vegetable.

Fennel bulb
photo by: gourmetsleuth.com

Also known as Sweet Anise. Sweet, mild licorice flavor. Popular European vegetables, especially in Italy and France. Not to be confused with herb anise, which is grown for its seeds and sold as seasoning. The feathery fronds can be used as an herb, like dill weed, to flavor soups and stews. The broad bulbous base is treated like a vegetable.

Equivalents

1 lb, 3 cups sliced

Ingredient Substitutions

Celery (more aromatic, cooks faster) OR 1 tsp fennel seed per lb of fennel, OR 1 tablespoon Pernod (liqueur) OR bok choy stems

 

 

FLAX

 

Flax (also known as common flax or linseed) (binomial name: Linum usitatissimum) is a member of the genus Linum in the family Linaceae. It is native to the region extending from the eastern Mediterranean to India and was probably first domesticated in the Fertile Crescent. This is called as Agasi/Akshi in Kannada, Jawas/Javas (जवस) or Alashi (अळशी) in Marathi.[1] Flax was extensively cultivated in ancient Egypt. Dyed flax fibers have been found in the Republic of Georgia in a prehistoric cave that date to 34,000 BC.[2][3] New Zealand flax is not related to flax, but was named after it as both plants are used to produce fibers.

Flax is an erect annual plant growing to 1.2 m (3 ft 11 in) tall, with slender stems. The leaves are glaucous green, slender lanceolate, 20–40 mm long and 3 mm broad. The flowers are pure pale blue, 15–25 mm diameter, with five petals; they can also be bright red. The fruit is a round, dry capsule 5–9 mm diameter, containing several glossy brown seeds shaped like an apple pip, 4–7 mm long.

In addition to referring to the plant itself, the word "flax" may refer to the unspun fibers of the flax plant.

 

GROATS

Groats are the hulled grains of various cereals, such as oats, wheat, barley or buckwheat (which is actually a pseudocereal). Groats from oats are a good source of avenanthramote.

Groats are nutritious but hard to chew, so they are often soaked and cooked. They can be the basis of kasha, a porridge-like staple meal of Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Roasted buckwheat groats are also known as kasha or kashi, especially in the United States.

Wheat groats, also known as bulgur (bulgar) are an essential ingredient of the middle eastern kitchen, including some salads like tabbouleh.

Groaty pudding, also known as groaty dick, is a traditional dish from the Black Country in England. It is made from soaked groats, leeks, onions, beef, and beef stock which is baked at 150 degrees Celsius for up to 16 hours. Groaty pudding is a traditional meal on Guy Fawkes Night.

 

Kale

borecole is a form of cabbage (Brassica oleracea Acephala Group), green or purple, in which the central leaves do not form a head. It is considered to be closer to wild cabbage than most domesticated forms.

 

KAMUT

KAMUT is a trademark owned by Kamut International, Ltd., used to market a variety of Khorasan wheat with certain guaranteed attributes. These attributes include certified organic production, preservation of the variety in its ancient, non-GMO form.[1] Kamut is higher in protein and many minerals, especially selenium, zinc, and magnesium than other wheat products.[2]

 

 

LAMBS LETTUCE

Corn salad (Valerianella locusta) is a small dicot annual plant of the family Valerianaceae. It is also called Lewiston cornsalad, lamb's lettuce, field salad, mâche, and rapunzel.

Corn salad grows in a low rosette with spatulate leaves up to 15.2 cm long.[1] It is a hardy plant that grows to zone 5, and in mild climates it is grown as a winter green. In warm conditions it tends to bolt to seed.[2]

Corn salad grows wild in parts of Europe, northern Africa and western Asia.[3] In Europe and Asia it is a common weed in cultivated land and waste spaces. In North America it has escaped cultivation and become naturalized on both the eastern and western seaboards.[4]

 

 

LEEK

The leek, Allium ampeloprasum var. porrum (L.), also sometimes known as Allium porrum, is a vegetable which belongs, along with the onion and garlic, to the Alliaceae family. Two related vegetables, the elephant garlic and kurrat, are also variant subspecies of Allium ampeloprasum, although different in their uses as food.The edible part of the leek plant is a bundle of leaf sheaths which is sometimes called a stem or stalk.

 

 

LENTILS

The lentil or daal or dal (Lens culinaris), considered a type of pulse, is a bushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. It is about 15 inches (38 cm) tall and the seeds grow in pods, usually with two seeds in each. The seeds have a short cooking time (especially for small varieties with the husk removed, such as the common red lentil) and a distinctive earthy flavor. Lentils are used to prepare an inexpensive and nutritious soup all over Europe and North and South America, sometimes combined with some form of chicken or pork. They are frequently combined with rice, which has a similar cooking time. A lentil and rice dish is referred to in the Middle East as mujaddara or mejadra. Rice and lentils are also cooked together in khichdi, a popular Indian dish.

PAK-CHOI
Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subspecies, see below), also known as snow cabbage[citation needed], is a Chinese leaf vegetable often used in Chinese cuisine. The vegetable is related to the Western cabbage, and is of the same species as the common turnip. There are many variations on its name, spelling, and scientific classification.

 

 

SPELT

Spelt (Triticum spelta) is a hexaploid species of wheat. Spelt was an important staple in parts of Europe from the Bronze Age to medieval times; it now survives as a relict crop in Central Europe and has found a new market as a health food. Spelt is sometimes considered a subspecies of the closely related species common wheat (T. aestivum), in which case its botanical name is considered to be Triticum aestivum subsp. spelta.

 

 

 SWEDE/RUTABAGA

 For the Drosophila gene, see Rutabaga (gene).

For similar vegetables also called "turnip", see Turnip (disambiguation).

Swede, (Yellow) turnip, Rutabaga

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/da/Rootveg_rutabaga.jpg/180px-Rootveg_rutabaga.jpg

Scientific classification

Kingdom:

Plantae

(unranked):

Angiosperms

(unranked):

Eudicots

(unranked):

Rosids

Order:

Brassicales

Family:

Brassicaceae

Genus:

Brassica

Species:

B. napobrassica

Binomial name

Brassica napobrassica
(L.) Mill.

The rutabaga, swede (from Swedish turnip), or yellow turnip (Brassica napobrassica, or Brassica napus var. napobrassica) is a root vegetable that originated as a cross between the cabbage and the turnip. Its leaves can also be eaten as a leaf vegetable.

 

 

Tahini ( ground sesame seeds)

(Arabic tahina: طحينة), zhimajiang (芝麻醤), nerigoma (ねりごま), טחינה (tahina or t'hina - Hebrew), Tashi (τασιή) in Cyprus or sesame paste is a paste of ground sesame seeds used in cooking. Middle Eastern tahini is made of hulled, lightly roasted seeds. East Asian sesame paste is made of unhulled seeds.

Tahini is a major component of hummus and other Middle Eastern foods. It is sold fresh or dehydrated.

Sesame paste is an ingredient in some Chinese, Korean, and Japanese dishes; it is used in some versions of the Szechuan dish Dan dan noodles. Because East Asian sesame paste is made from unhulled seeds, it is more bitter than tahin

 

TOFU

 

Tofu (豆腐, tōfu?), or bean curd[5] is a soft white food made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks. It is of Chinese origin,[6] and part of East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine such as Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indonesian, Vietnamese[7] and others.[8] There are many different varieties of tofu, including fresh tofu and tofu that has been processed in some way. Tofu has very little flavor or smell on its own, so it can be used either in savory or sweet dishes, and is often seasoned or marinated to suit the dish. Tofu is low in calories, contains a relatively large amount of iron and contains little fat. Depending on the coagulant used in manufacturing, the tofu may also be high in calcium and/or magnesium.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STORES AND RESOURCES

 

LOCAL

 

Whole Foods Market

 - wholefoodsmarket-kirby.suggestionbox.com
2955 Kirby Dr, Houston - (713) 520-1937

Whole Foods Market Houston - Wilcrest

 - www.wholefoodsmarket.com
11145 Westheimer Rd, Houston - (713) 784-7776
5 reviews, directions, hours, and more »

Whole Foods Market

 - www.wholefoodsmarket.com
6401 Woodway Dr # 149, Houston - (713) 789-4477
5 reviews, directions, and more »

 

More results near Houston, TX 77070 »

1.   Whole Foods Market Locations by Map - AllStays Guide

Free and easy to use map locator guide to Whole Foods Market locations.
www.allstays.com/c/whole-foods-locations-map.htm - Cached - Similar

 

 

 

 

ASandy's Produce Market‎ - Rated 4.3 out of 5.0http://maps.gstatic.com/intl/en_us/mapfiles/transparent.pnghttp://maps.gstatic.com/intl/en_us/mapfiles/transparent.pnghttp://maps.gstatic.com/intl/en_us/mapfiles/transparent.pngGEORGIA’S FARM TO MARKET 281-940-0990

Address:

12171 Katy Fwy

Houston, TX 77079

 

WESTSIDE ORGANIC CO-OP

WestSideOrganics@gmail.com

ON HWY 6 S OF WEST LITTLE YORK

PICKUP 11-1 AM OR 4:30 – 7 PM

 

 

WEST MEMORIAL CO-OP

LOCATION – I-10 AND BW8

PICKUP 3-630

WWW.WESTMEMORIALCO-OP.COM

 

 

 

 

ONLINE

 

SUN ORGANIC FARMS

 

JEN REVIEWS
   https://www.jenreviews.com/pork-pie/
   https://www.jenreviews.com/lo-mein-recipe/

   https://www.jenreviews.com/thai-red-curry-recipe/

 

 

 

 

ßPREVIOUS   NEXTà

 

 

 

HOW TO CONTROL PH.htm